Bipotisan

Mission is to help America become the largest producer of hemp in the world.

From drafts of our founding documents to the sustainable paneling of 21st century cars, hemps, versatility and strength have made it the fabric of the American imagination. Today, hemp is used in clothing, biofuels, plastics, personal care, feed and food.

The History You Didn’t Know.

Unfortunately, in the early 1900s, hemp was erroneously lumped in with its cousin marijuana, which was facing more stringent regulation. In 1957 amid an anti-marijuana hysteria, hemp was banned as a schedule 1 substance by the Federal government.

TODAY

The passing of the 2018 Farm bill lifts all restrictions on industrial hemp cultivation from a Federal level, allowing for the full return of this important American crop.  Further, by redefining hemp to include its “extracts, cannabinoids and derivatives,” Congress has made it clear that hemp-derived products, such as Cannabidiol (CBD), are not considered controlled substances.

In 2018, 23 states grew hemp in the United States for a total of 78,176 acres of crops, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) expects that number to more than quadruple in 2019. While that’s a significant increase from just one year prior when only 25,713 acres of hemp crops were grown and from two years ago when just 9,770 acres of hemp crops were grown, the U.S. is still significantly behind in the hemp industry compared to other countries.

Hemp is grown in approximately 30 countries. China is the largest hemp producer and exporter in the world and is responsible for an estimated 1/5 of total global hemp production. Other hemp producing countries include Canada, France (the largest producer in the European Union), Spain, Austria, Australia, and Russia. Prior to the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, the United States imported approximately $600 million of hemp products each year, because hemp could only be grown in states that had approved pilot or research programs.

Hemp began its resurgence in Europe in the 1980s, and Australia has been growing it for 20 years. It was legalized in Canada in 1998. In comparison, the U.S. only passed the Farm Bill in 2014, which allowed states to launch hemp cultivation programs for research and development only. And it wasn’t until the 2018 Farm Bill passed in December 2018 that cultivators, processors, and so on could start getting hemp licenses where states would allow them. However, hemp is still only grown in fewer than half of the states in the country.

Bottom-line, the U.S. is decades behind many other countries and has a lot of catching up to do. Here are a few obstacles the U.S. has to overcome to be competitive in the global hemp market.

Hemp is NOT Marijuana

Hemp and marijuana come from the same plant family, cannabis, but are different in many ways — similar to how lemons and grapefruits are both citrus, but are genetically very different.  From a legal standpoint, hemp must have less than 0.3% THC (the psychoactive component that gets you hight).  Marijuana contains higher levels of THC, which is why marijuana can get you high, but hemp can’t.

A Responsible Industry

The hemp industry recently launched the US Hemp Authority, whose Certification Program serves to provide high standards, best practices and self-regulation, giving confidence to consumers and law enforcement that hemp products are safe, and legal.  Companies that meet these stringent self-regulatory standards and pass an independent third-party audit will be licensed to use our Certified Seal on their products. (US Hemp Authority Certified).

Great for Farmers

  • Hemp requires little to no use of toxic pesticides or herbicides, making it a clean and safe crop to grow. It also grows well in a variety of climates, and gives nutrients back to the soil in which it’s grown.
  • Young people are seeing a viable future in hemp, which could help save family farms.
  • The the passing of the 2014 Federal Farm bill, from 2014-2017, hemp acreage increased 600% and now those numbers continue to grow.
  • Passage of the 2018 Farm bill means that hemp farmers may now finally access needed crop insurance and fully participate in USDA programs for certification and competitive grants. This is a huge win for US farmers.

Great for Retailers

Products like CBD, hempseed oil and hemp protein are hot. The hemp industry has surpassed $2B in consumer sales  ($820M in 2017 alone). Independent health food stores, in particular, have benefitted from this growth.

Great for Consumers

  • Industrial hemp is being in hundreds of different applications including consumer textiles, personal care, industrial components, and health supplements like CBD.
  • US Hemp employment has surged to 185,000 full time employees. By 2020, it’s expected to grow to over a quarter of a million jobs, outpacing manufacturing in many states.
  • Hemp-derived products are used by a wide range of consumers from athletes, to pet owners, to aging seniors.

Interested in learning about hemp laws across the country? Visit the US Hemp Roundtable State Action Center, www.hempsupporter.com/stateactioncenter.

US Hemp Roundtable hemp supporter.com

 

 

 

 

 

1. Regulations

The 2018 Farm Bill was passed in December 2018, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture still hasn’t released federal hemp production rules, which the industry needs to prepare for the 2020 growing season. The rules will address testing, transportation, seed sourcing, and more.

However, the rules are interim, which means they could (and most likely will) change before final regulations are released for 2020. Once the federal rules are released, states and local municipalities will need to modify their own rules to be in compliance.

2. Supply Chain Infrastructure

While countries with established hemp industries have their supply chains in place and have worked out many of the kinks, the U.S. has no such supply chain in place. For many U.S. farmers, growing hemp is easy, but selling it might not be. Farmers need a network to process materials or they can’t be certain they can turn a profit from a hemp crop.

The U.S. hemp market is expected to grow to $1.8 billion by 2020. Supply chain infrastructure needs to be in place to meet growing demand domestically but also for the U.S. to become competitive in the hemp market on a global scale. One of the biggest early problems is related to interstate hemp transportation, which has already prompted multiple lawsuits.

3. Plant Research and Genetics

Since hemp has been illegal in the U.S. for so long, cultivators and scientists haven’t had access to it on a large scale, which means the U.S. is lagging behind other countries in genetics and breeding research. As with other agricultural industries, the hemp industry needs access to stable seed genetics.

Longtime breeders say they’re at least five years from developing stable genetics that can produce reliable traits in different climates.

4. Banking and Insurance

Despite the fact that hemp is now legal in the U.S., hemp license holders continue to face roadblocks when it comes to banking and insurance. As of mid-2019, many banks and credit card processors still view hemp businesses as high risk.

The same is true of insurance providers. While the USDA’s Risk Management Agency announced insurance coverage for hemp grown for fiber, flower, or seeds under the Whole-Farm Revenue Protection (WFRP) program, it’s only available to producers in areas that are covered by USDA-approved hemp plans or to producers that are part of state- or university-approved research pilot programs. For other hemp license holders, insurance is either difficult or impossible to get.

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In 2018, 23 states grew hemp in the United States for a total of 78,176 acres of crops, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) expects that number to more than quadruple in 2019. While that’s a significant increase from just one year prior when only 25,713 acres of hemp crops were grown and from two years ago when just 9,770 acres of hemp crops were grown, the U.S. is still significantly behind in the hemp industry compared to other countries.

Hemp is grown in approximately 30 countries. China is the largest hemp producer and exporter in the world and is responsible for an estimated 1/5 of total global hemp production. Other hemp producing countries include Canada, France (the largest producer in the European Union), Spain, Austria, Australia, and Russia. Prior to the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, the United States imported approximately $600 million of hemp products each year, because hemp could only be grown in states that had approved pilot or research programs.

Hemp began its resurgence in Europe in the 1980s, and Australia has been growing it for 20 years. It was legalized in Canada in 1998. In comparison, the U.S. only passed the Farm Bill in 2014, which allowed states to launch hemp cultivation programs for research and development only. And it wasn’t until the 2018 Farm Bill passed in December 2018 that cultivators, processors, and so on could start getting hemp licenses where states would allow them. However, hemp is still only grown in fewer than half of the states in the country.

Bottom-line, the U.S. is decades behind many other countries and has a lot of catching up to do. Here are a few obstacles the U.S. has to overcome to be competitive in the global hemp market:

1. Regulations

The 2018 Farm Bill was passed in December 2018, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture still hasn’t released federal hemp production rules, which the industry needs to prepare for the 2020 growing season. The rules will address testing, transportation, seed sourcing, and more.

However, the rules are interim, which means they could (and most likely will) change before final regulations are released for 2020. Once the federal rules are released, states and local municipalities will need to modify their own rules to be in compliance.

2. Supply Chain Infrastructure

While countries with established hemp industries have their supply chains in place and have worked out many of the kinks, the U.S. has no such supply chain in place. For many U.S. farmers, growing hemp is easy, but selling it might not be. Farmers need a network to process materials or they can’t be certain they can turn a profit from a hemp crop.

The U.S. hemp market is expected to grow to $1.8 billion by 2020. Supply chain infrastructure needs to be in place to meet growing demand domestically but also for the U.S. to become competitive in the hemp market on a global scale. One of the biggest early problems is related to interstate hemp transportation, which has already prompted multiple lawsuits.

3. Plant Research and Genetics

Since hemp has been illegal in the U.S. for so long, cultivators and scientists haven’t had access to it on a large scale, which means the U.S. is lagging behind other countries in genetics and breeding research. As with other agricultural industries, the hemp industry needs access to stable seed genetics.

Longtime breeders say they’re at least five years from developing stable genetics that can produce reliable traits in different climates.

4. Banking and Insurance

Despite the fact that hemp is now legal in the U.S., hemp license holders continue to face roadblocks when it comes to banking and insurance. As of mid-2019, many banks and credit card processors still view hemp businesses as high risk.

The same is true of insurance providers. While the USDA’s Risk Management Agency announced insurance coverage for hemp grown for fiber, flower, or seeds under the Whole-Farm Revenue Protection (WFRP) program, it’s only available to producers in areas that are covered by USDA-approved hemp plans or to producers that are part of state- or university-approved research pilot programs. For other hemp license holders, insurance is either difficult or impossible to get.

From our drafts of our founding documents to the sustainable paneling of 21st century cars, hemp versatility and strength have made it the fabric of the American imagination. Today, hemp is used in clothing, biofuels, plastics, personal care, feed and food.

China is the largest hemp producer and exporter in the world and is responsible for an estimated 1/5 of total global hemp production. Other hemp producing countries include Canada, France (the largest producer in the European Union), Spain, Austria, Australia, and Russia.

Hemp – Is It Too Late for the U.S. to Compete?

The Big Question for Hemp in the U.S.

In 2018, 23 states grew hemp in the United States for a total of 78,176 acres of crops, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) expected that number to more than quadruple in 2019. While that’s a significant increase from just one year prior when only 25,713 acres of hemp crops were grown and from two years ago when just 9,770 acres of hemp crops were grown, the U.S. is still significantly behind in the hemp industry compared to other countries.

Hemp is grown in approximately 30 countries. China is the largest hemp producer and exporter in the world and is responsible for an estimated 1/5 of total global hemp production. Other hemp producing countries include Canada, France (the largest producer in the European Union), Spain, Austria, Australia, and Russia. Prior to the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, the United States imported approximately $600 million of hemp products each year, because hemp could only be grown in states that had approved pilot or research programs.

Hemp began its resurgence in Europe in the 1980s, and Australia has been growing it for 20 years. It was legalized in Canada in 1998. In comparison, the U.S. only passed the Farm Bill in 2014, which allowed states to launch hemp cultivation programs for research and development only. And it wasn’t until the 2018 Farm Bill passed in December 2018 that cultivators, processors, and so on could start getting hemp licenses where states would allow them. However, hemp is still only grown in fewer than half of the states in the country.

Bottom-line, the U.S. is decades behind many other countries and has a lot of catching up to do. Here are a few obstacles the U.S. has to overcome to be competitive in the global hemp market:

1. Regulations

The 2018 Farm Bill was passed in December 2018, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture still hasn’t released federal hemp production rules, which the industry needs to prepare for the 2020 growing season. The rules will address testing, transportation, seed sourcing, and more.

However, the rules are interim, which means they could (and most likely will) change before final regulations are released for 2020. Once the federal rules are released, states and local municipalities will need to modify their own rules to be in compliance.

2. Supply Chain Infrastructure

While countries with established hemp industries have their supply chains in place and have worked out many of the kinks, the U.S. has no such supply chain in place. For many U.S. farmers, growing hemp is easy, but selling it might not be. Farmers need a network to process materials or they can’t be certain they can turn a profit from a hemp crop.

The U.S. hemp market is expected to grow to $1.8 billion by 2020. Supply chain infrastructure needs to be in place to meet growing demand domestically but also for the U.S. to become competitive in the hemp market on a global scale. One of the biggest early problems is related to interstate hemp transportation, which has already prompted multiple lawsuits.

3. Plant Research and Genetics

Since hemp has been illegal in the U.S. for so long, cultivators and scientists haven’t had access to it on a large scale, which means the U.S. is lagging behind other countries in genetics and breeding research. As with other agricultural industries, the hemp industry needs access to stable seed genetics.

Longtime breeders say they’re at least five years from developing stable genetics that can produce reliable traits in different climates.

4. Banking and Insurance

Despite the fact that hemp is now legal in the U.S., hemp license holders continue to face roadblocks when it comes to banking and insurance. As of mid-2019, many banks and credit card processors still view hemp businesses as high risk.

The same is true of insurance providers. While the USDA’s Risk Management Agency announced insurance coverage for hemp grown for fiber, flower, or seeds under the Whole-Farm Revenue Protection (WFRP) program, it’s only available to producers in areas that are covered by USDA-approved hemp plans or to producers that are part of state- or university-approved research pilot programs. For other hemp license holders, insurance is either difficult or impossible to get.

Things are moving quickly in the U.S. hemp industry since the 2018 Farm Bill passed, and once the USDA releases its final rules for the hemp industry, things will move even faster. However, industry experts warn that the U.S. is already growing 8-times the amount of CBD hemp it can consume, and as a result, prices are crashing.

With a late start to the hemp industry and a litany of strict regulations, is it too late for the U.S. to effectively catch up to and compete with China, Canada, France, and other countries with far more experience, looser regulations, established infrastructure, and existing demand?

A platform that delivers the leads and relationship building tools you need.

Explore endless capabilities that make finding and connecting with cannabis and hemp license holders in the USA.

In order to there we need educate farms from small to large on the best growing practices, become a world leader in the cannabis industry and support political candidates who have the same goals as our organization.

How to Become a Cannabis Advocate.

Become a Texas Cannabis Advocate

JOIN.     NEWS.     LEARN MORE.     TAKE ACTION.    SUPPORT.     VOTER GUIDE.     PODCAST.

Texas Marijuana Policy Voter Guide 

  1. Farmers, small to large, must be allowed to grown cannabis in every count and state in the country.  Requiring strict guidelines regarding organic growing practices, sustainable genetics, utilizing solar and rain water collection.

We recommend taking the following actions in your area:

  • Register yourself and educate others on registering to vote – This is the only way we can be eligible to vote for cannabis-friendly candidates. Register to vote!
  • Look up the State Representatives and State Senators for your area. Find supportive candidates on social media and follow them. Encourage your members to volunteer for their campaigns. Build relationships and plan on staying in touch throughout the legislative process.
  • Remind everyone to vote!! Early Voting Begins: Monday, June 29, 2020 | Election Day: Tuesday, July 14, 2020.

The global marijuana market increased by 37% in 2018, which is beyond impressive. The global spending on marijuana is forecast to reach $57 billion. Recreational marijuana will make the majority of it (67%), while medical marijuana spending is about 33%. (Hemp stats)

  1. The first country that legalized marijuana completely was Uruguay in 2013.
  2. Canada followed suit last year.
  3. At the moment, the USA is still pondering complete legalization, despite the obvious benefits. For example, the employment rates have escalated due to the marijuana and cannabis industry. In 2017, new cannabis jobs were given to 121,000 people and the demand for retailers and experts is constantly rising.

The recreational weed states are the following: Alaska, California, Colorado, Main, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and Washington, D.C. New York and New Jersey are usually mentioned as the great candidates when discussing the legalization. Illinois has just joined the crowd as of January 2020.

Should marijuana become legal nationally,  the first thing we can expect are some great savings, as $3.6 billion of the US citizens’ money was spent on enforcing marijuana possession laws in 2010. What is more, lucrative opportunities are to follow, too. Just look at the most recent marijuana taxes. Washington has the highest taxes on marijuana, so it managed to yield $319 million, with California being a close second ($300 million) and Colorado state tax for marijuana bringing $266 million. If marijuana were legal on the federal level, the US Treasury would collect one hefty sum.

Instead of spending our money in other countries for hemp, why not teach our farmers how to better grow it her.

Legality of Cannabis by US Jurisdiction.

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